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Classic Synthesizer: The Minimoog - LFO and keyboard control

So far, we have had the 'Osc-3 Control' switched on. But what does this mean? Simply that the frequency of Oscillator 3 is controlled by the keyboard. With this switch in the down (off) position then Oscillator 3 becomes an independent low frequency oscillator. Flick the Oscillator Modulation switch to the right and the mod wheel next to the keyboard, or your MIDI modulation wheel if you are using a Midi Mini, governs the amount of vibrato...

So far, we have had the 'Osc-3 Control' switched on. But what does this mean? Simply that the frequency of Oscillator 3 is controlled by the keyboard. With this switch in the down (off) position then Oscillator 3 becomes an independent low frequency oscillator. Flick the Oscillator Modulation switch to the right and the mod wheel next to the keyboard, or your MIDI modulation wheel if you are using a Midi Mini, governs the amount of vibrato. The Range setting and fine tune knob of Oscillator 3 control the rate.

Play with that for a moment then switch it off and set the Filter Modulation switch on (to the right). Now the modulation wheel controls the filter cut off frequency. This sounds great and it is particularly nice to put a guitar through an analogue filter and get a lovely bubbly wah-wah effect, better than you ever get from a pedal. If you really want to, you can modulate frequency and filter at the same time. In fact that is one of the best uses of the Minimoog - producing weird sounds. Experiment with some of the higher ranges of Oscillator 3 and you'll start to get some pleasant, and unpleasant, growl effects, all classic analogue synth noises.

Of course there is still more to learn. Like the two Keyboard Control switches. Basically, if these are both off (left) then the keyboard will have no effect on the cut off frequency of the filter. Set switch 1 to the right and the filter will partially track, increasing the brightness as you go up the keyboard, but not very much. Switch both on and the filter will track the keyboard precisely. Different combinations of the switches gives you different amounts of tracking. One case when you need full tracking is when you use the Minimoog's extra oscillator. "Where's that?" you ask, "I see no extra oscillator." In fact, if you increase the Emphasis (resonance) of the filter then it starts to oscillate itself. This is great for whistley type noises, and for weird ones too! Also the white or pink noise source is good for mixing in in small quantities to give added bite to a sound.

By now, if you have access to a Minimoog, you should be getting some really powerful Techno type sounds out of it. But there's still one control yet to be revealed, so that you won't use it in error. My feeling is that although revivals of all kinds of material have kept the music world alive during the late 80s and 90s, the world is not quite ready for the Rick Wakeman style of portamento, or 'Glide', that the Minimoog provides. Please, please keep clear of it until at least 2010!

By the way... If you have used older analogue synths before then you will know this perfectly well. If you have been brought up in the digital age then this might come as a shock:

Advanced though it was when it first appeared, the Minimoog can only play one note at a time.

By David Mellor Thursday January 1, 2004