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Timber-Line Acoustic Pickup Gains a Voltage Booster Circuit

D-TAR, the new company that joins acoustic pickup designer Rick Turner with Seymour Duncan Pickups, has released a announced version of the Timber-Line, their coaxial under-saddle transducer ("UST"). Unlike other USTs, Timber-Line's preamp operates with an 18-volt power supply, which effectively doubles the headroom of lower-powered 9-volt on-board preamps...

December 31, 2004

D-TAR, the new company that joins acoustic pickup designer Rick Turner with Seymour Duncan Pickups, has released a announced version of the Timber-Line, their coaxial under-saddle transducer ("UST"). Unlike other USTs, Timber-Line's preamp operates with an 18-volt power supply, which effectively doubles the headroom of lower-powered 9-volt on-board preamps; allowing for a wider dynamic range and harder strumming without piezo "quack." However, until now, users had to rely on a pair of bulky 9-volt batteries to derive the 18 volts.

D-TAR will now ship their Timber-Line with an 18-volt power supply that derives 18 volts from two standard AA batteries. The secret is a proprietary voltage converter circuit that mounts next to the battery clip. It's fully shielded and it's around the size of a postage stamp.

The new battery booster has several advantages over the old double 9-volt system. It's smaller and lighter, taking up less space and adding less weight to the instrument. AA batteries are less expensive than 9 volts, resulting in lower operating cost to the end user. The new Timber-Line will also deliver250 hours of continuous usage from a pair of AAs.

For more information, visit their web site at www.d-tar.com

By our press release coordinator Thursday January 1, 2004